O My Thoughts, Surcease

THE RAVEN.
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The horse-hoofs ringing clear; Tlot-tlot, tlot-tlot , in the distance? Were they deaf that they did not hear? The red-coats looked to their priming! She stood up, straight and still! Tlot-tlot , in the frosty silence! Tlot-tlot , in the echoing night! Nearer he came and nearer! Her face was like a light! Back, he spurred like a madman, shrieking a curse to the sky, With the white road smoking behind him and his rapier brandished high! How does this poem make you feel after you read it?

subjective

Give two examples of words the poet uses that make you feel this way. Make a recording of this poem. Do you think that it is easier to understand poems when they are read aloud? How does the end of the poem make you feel? Is it tragic or hopeful?

You can deny the inevitable but not defy it—still there are a few compensations to growing old

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What words make you think that? Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered , weak and weary, Over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore — While I nodded, nearly napping, suddenly there came a tapping, As of some one gently rapping, rapping at my chamber door. Ah, distinctly I remember it was in the bleak December, And each separate dying ember wrought its ghost upon the floor.

Back into the chamber turning, all my soul within me burning, Soon again I heard a tapping something louder than before. Open here I flung the shutter, when, with many a flirt and flutter, In there stepped a stately Raven of the saintly days of yore. Then, methought, the air grew denser, perfumed from an unseen censer Swung by Seraphim whose foot-falls tinkled on the tufted floor.

Quaff , oh quaff this kind nepenthe and forget this lost Lenore! By that Heaven that bends above us—by that God we both adore— Tell this soul with sorrow laden if, within the distant Aidenn , It shall clasp a sainted maiden whom the angels name Lenore— Clasp a rare and radiant maiden whom the angels name Lenore.

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Leave no black plume as a token of that lie thy soul has spoken! Leave my loneliness unbroken! Take thy beak from out my heart, and take thy form from off my door!

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Give three examples of descriptive language or imagery that the poet uses effectively in this poem. What questions does Poe ask the raven, and how do they relate to Lenore? Compare and contrast the two poems. Who are you? Are you — Nobody — Too? How dreary — to be — Somebody! Write your own poem about this. Draw a picture of the blacksmith. Now Sam McGee was from Tennessee, where the cotton blooms and blows. On a Christmas Day we were mushing our way over the Dawson trail.

Talk of your cold! He crouched on the sleigh, and he raved all day of his home in Tennessee; And before nightfall a corpse was all that was left of Sam McGee. Now a promise made is a debt unpaid, and the trail has its own stern code. And then when Cooney died at first, and Barrows did the same, A sickly silence fell upon of the patrons of the game.

A straggling few got up to go in deep despair. The rest Clung to that hope which springs eternal in the human breast. But Flynn let drive a single, to the wonderment of all, And Blake, the much despised , tore the cover off the ball; And when the dust had lifted, and the men saw what had occurred, There was Johnnie safe at second, and Flynn a-hugging third. Then from 5, throats and more there rose a lusty yell; It rumbled through the valley, it rattled in the dell ; It knocked upon the mountain and recoiled upon the flat, For Casey, mighty Casey, was advancing to the bat.

John Ward: The First Set of English Madrigals

Only this, and nothing more. This it is, and nothing more. Darkness there, and nothing more. Perched, and sat, and nothing more. She shall press, ah, nevermore! Is there — is there balm in Gilead? He begins with an image and a reaction to it. He fights against, questions, and gradually becomes absorbed in a picture of.

Mine eyes are made the fools o' th' other senses, lines Or else worth all the rest. The image in his mind frightens him, and the actor is given specific terms in which to explore his fear: heart beating. Now begins the process of projectirig this terrible instigation, the dagger in his mind, outward into the world around him. Again Macbeth ambiguously defines the source of the image which obsesses him. He locates his murderous 'creation' not in his mind but in a deceptively objectified future - the.

The phrase almost acknowledges - but also helps to obscure - the mental origin of the dagger. Next comes the decisive movement outside Macbeth's mind: Now o'er the one-ha]f world Nature seems dead, and wicked dreams abuse The curtain'd sleep: now witchcraft celebrates PaIe Hecate's offerings; and wither'd murder, Alarum'd by his sentinel, the wolf, Whose howl's his watch, thus with his stealthy pace, With Tarquin's ravishing strides, toward his design Moves like a ghost. He transforms his passion into action by imitating the very image of murder he has projected.

The Raven by Edgar Allan Poe | Poetry Foundation

The bloody business now informs all nature, and through it moves the figure of Murder, whom Macbeth proceeds to imitate. The reference to Murder's 'pace' and 'stride' leads naturally to Macbeth's own steps:. Thou sure and firm-set earth, Hear not my steps which way they walk, for fear Thy very stones prate of my whereabout, And take the present horror from the time, Which now suits with it.

The psychological and mimetic process by which the actor can become a murderer has been very thoroughly laid out. At this point, the histrionic complexity of the speech can be felt in a single word: Whiles.

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Solicit, in its Elizabethan meanings, is a word of manifold suggestion, linking all kinds of persuasion - evil,. That is part a tragic figure. Next comes the decisive movement outside Macbeth's mind: Now o'er the one-ha]f world Nature seems dead, and wicked dreams abuse The curtain'd sleep: now witchcraft celebrates PaIe Hecate's offerings; and wither'd murder, Alarum'd by his sentinel, the wolf, Whose howl's his watch, thus with his stealthy pace, With Tarquin's ravishing strides, toward his design Moves like a ghost. Here is Lear: Deny to speak. It is typical of him that he now sees the mental process he has just gone through as no more than 'words', that he wishes to accelerate away from imagination toward pure deed. Both in sound and sense, they smother each other.

What process of articulation in the previous lines has allowed Macbeih to describe them as a threat? Surely it is a movement like the one just described, the projection of his murderous design outward into the world. He sees his speech as.?

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And though he can now dismiss what he has just said as merely verbal 'Words to the heat of deeds too cold breath gives' , the speech has quite literally got him moving. Moreover, it has done so by transforming him into the image of murder he has projected.

Macbeth has become the very atmosphere of horror which he describes. It is typical of him that he now sees the mental process he has just gone through as no more than 'words', that he wishes to accelerate away from imagination toward pure deed. Macbeth, of course, regularly tries to silence or 'outrun' his moral imagination by hurrying into action, but it should be noted that in this habit of action he simply parallels his habits of thought and speech.

Both verbally and politically, Macbeth's way of dealing with the evil he discovers in himself is to recreate the universe in its image. The Scotland he creates, like the thick nig[1 he invokes or the meaningless universe he describes in Act V, is a product of the dagger in his mind. From the time the witches appear to him, Macbeth lives in a false creation, governed by a 'fatal vision' that is his own.

As we have seen, Macbeth's movement of mind often takes off from an image or idea that will not go away, thatinsists on persisting. His thoughts thicken around it - the horrid image of the suggestion of murder, the air-drawn dagger, the fact that Banquo lives, the memory of Banquo's ghost. He keeps coming back to it, and his language allows the actor to fee[ the persistent image thickening his thought, sometimes accompanied by the effort of his thought to rise out of the thickn-ess 'It will have blood, they say' - until he makes the move that gets him for the moment beyond the obstruction in his head, but leaves him as it were coated, stained, and smeared by it.

First, Macbeth in public speech often negotiates groups of parallel words more firmly than in private, establishing their relation as one of wit, which depends on and enforces moral clarity: Who can be wise, amaz'd, temperate and furious, The murkier soliloquies suggest that the action here is an effortful keeping apart of polar opposites. They collapse and contaminate each other when Macbeth is alone.

Nobody Gets Out of Here Alive

Thus the characteristic combination of movements in the more private p:assages: quiek, forward, out of the murk; slow, mesrnertzed, sinking deeper into it. It is. While he rages, we note again thi habit he has, or that his mind has, of keeping a single image obsessively before him:.